When

Monday, August 3, 2015 - 7:00pm

Tickets & Registration

Where

Support

The Helis Foundation is a Louisiana private foundation, established and funded by the William Helis Family. The Arts Funds of The Helis Foundation advance access to the arts for the community through contributions that sustain operations for, provide free admission to, acquire works of art, and underwrite major exhibitions and projects of institutions within the Greater New Orleans area.
The CAC is supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works. The CAC is supported in part by a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans as administered by the Arts Council New Orleans.

Join Curator Isolde Brielmaier, CAC Director and CEO Neil Barclay, and REVERB: Past Present, Future exhibition artists for a conversation about the exhibition, and the evolution of art and artistic practices in New Orleans and its surrounding areas since Hurricane Katrina.

Curator Bio

Isolde Brielmaier is the Director of the Contemporary Art Initiative, the public art platform at Westfield World Trade Center, which launches in 2015 and will include large scale public art installations, talks, a museum partnership, and artist grants, as well as school programming.
 
She is an Adjunct Professor at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and has curated, programmed, and written extensively on contemporary art and culture over the past decade. Isolde has developed contemporary art platforms and collaborations for a broad range of organizations and companies, including Richard Meier Architects, Versace, as well as the New York Armory Show and ARCO Madrid, among others.  Previously, Isolde has worked for the Guggenheim Museum, the Bronx Museum of Art, and as Chief Curator for the SCAD Museum of Art. She holds a PhD from Columbia University.

Artist Bios

Skylar Fein
Skylar Fein was born in Greenwich Village and raised in the Bronx. He has had many careers including teaching nonviolent resistance under the umbrella of the Quakers, working for a gay film festival in Seattle, stringing for The New York Times and as pre-med student at University of New Orleans where he moved one week before Hurricane Katrina hit.
 
In the wreckage of New Orleans, Fein found his new calling as an artist, experimenting with color and composition of the detritus of Katrina. His work soon became known for its pop sensibility as well as its hard-nosed politics. In the fall of 2008, his Prospect.1: Biennial installation, Remember the Upstairs Lounge, shined a spotlight on an overlooked piece of New Orleans history: a fire that swept through a French Quarter bar in 1973, killing everyone inside. The piece was praised in Artforum, Art In America, The New York Times Magazine and The New Yorker, among others.
 
In late 2009, Fein had his first solo museum show, Youth Manifesto, at the New Orleans Museum of Art. He has shown in solo and group exhibitions at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, C24 Gallery (New York, NY), Art Basel Miami Beach, Texas Contemporary, and artMRKT San Francisco. Fein was the recipient of a 2009 Joan Mitchell Foundation Award and his work is in several prominent collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, Brooklyn Museum, Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Louisiana State Museum, Birmingham Museum of Art, New Orleans Museum of Art, curators Dan Cameron and Bill Arning, and collectors Beth Rudin DeWoody, Lance Armstrong, Lawrence Benenson, Brooke Garber-Neidich, Stephanie Ingrassia and Thomas Coleman.
 
Norah Lovell
Norah Lovell (b. New York City) is a visual artist whose work includes works on paper, ephemera, books and paintings. She received her MFA from the University of Chicago and BFA from the University of New Mexico. Residing in New Orleans since 2008, she was the recipient of a Joan Mitchell Center grant and studio residency for 2013-14.
 
Lovell's work has been exhibited at the CAC and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, and it has received an honorable mention from curator Franklin Sirmans (LACMA). Lovell has exhibited solo at Callan Contemporary and is included in the Drawing Center Museum’s Viewing Program (New York, NY). Her recent work was on view at ArtPrize 2014 at the Grand Rapids Art Museum (Grand Rapids, MI), and she was included in multiple Propsect.3+ International Art Biennial venues in New Orleans, LA.
 
Rontherin Ratliff
Rontherin Ratliff (b. New Orleans, 1977) is a conceptual artist, who creates mixed media assemblages, art installations and sculptures. His pieces directly respond to everyday experiences and the surrounding environment.
 
In 2009, Works and Process at the Guggenheim commissioned Ratliff to lead the artistic direction and co-create the set installation for the production of Peter and the Wolf.  In 2010, the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans public art project ArtShops, supported by the Joan Mitchell Foundation, commissioned Sounds of A Crescent City, a large-scale sculpture in New Orleans Habitat For Humanity’s Musicians’ Village.  In 2012, the Arts Council of New Orleans “Percent for Art” project commissioned Way Down Yonder in New Orleans, a site-specific public art installation for The Norman Mayer Branch Library. Ratliff has exhibited at the New Orleans Museum of Modern Art (LA), the CAC New Orleans, Rebecca Randall Bryan Gallery at Coastal Carolina University (SC), and other galleries in conjunction with Prospect New Orleans 1, 1.5, 2, and 3.
 
In 2014, Ratliff participated in the Artist In Residence Program at the Joan Mitchell Center (New Orleans, LA), and he was selected as one of the collaborating artists for the nationally acclaimed street art installation ExhibitBe (New Orleans, LA) where he created site-specific installations Hanging In the Balance and Storm Clouds.  In 2015, the Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator awarded Ratliff with an artist residency in Miami, FL.

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