When

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 7:00pm

Tickets & Registration

$8 General Admission

Free for CAC & NOFS Members

Where

Tags

Support

Support for this exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.
The Helis Foundation is a Louisiana private foundation, established and funded by the William Helis Family. The Arts Funds of The Helis Foundation advance access to the arts for the community through contributions that sustain operations for, provide free admission to, acquire works of art, and underwrite major exhibitions and projects of institutions within the Greater New Orleans area.
Support for this exhibition is provided by the Sydney & Walda Besthoff Foundation and the John T. Scott Guild.
The CAC is supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works. The CAC is supported in part by a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans as administered by the Arts Council New Orleans.

SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL

Director JEAN-LUC GODARD
Year 1968
Runtime 100 MINUTES
Country UK

In concert with the CAC’s exhibition, Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible, the CAC and NOFS are proud to present Jean-Luc Godard’s Sympathy for the Devil. The model for Pendleton’s 2012 film, BAND (chronicling the band Deerhoof in the context of contemporary politics), Godard's film uses the leitmotif of the Rolling Stones at work on their song Sympathy for the Devil at the original 1968 recording sessions to document both the band’s creative process and a narrative of revolutionary thought and action.

Featuring the original Rolling Stones line-up of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman, and Brian Jones, the film—Godard’s first English language feature—was originally released in 1968 at the culmination of a year of political and social upheaval throughout the western world.

As the band—augmented by Nicky Hopkins, Rocky Dijon, Marianne Faithfull and Anita Pallenberg—works to nail down the definitive version of the song, the film’s plot casts a jaundiced eye on U.S. politics as viewed through the prism of the counter culture and Black Power movement.  

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