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Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 7:00pm

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FREE for CAC & NOFS Members

$7 General Admission

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The CAC is supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works. The CAC is supported in part by a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans as administered by the Arts Council New Orleans.

BROTHERS OF THE BLACK LIST

Director Sean Gallagher
Year 2014
Runtime 74 minutes
Country USA

Co-presented with the New Orleans Film Society (NOFS) as part of their 6-film series entitled Power and Resistance, which spotlights films about individuals and organizations unafraid to stand up, fight back, and start revolutions—both large and small.
 
In what became the longest litigated civil rights case in American history, 125 black male students were interrogated in response to an attempted rape, under a presumption of guilty until proven innocent. An emotional story of social justice, Brothers of the Black List is a cautionary tale of equal rights gone wrong that remains relevant.
 
SYNOPSIS September 4, 1992: An elderly woman in a small town in upstate New York reports an attempted rape by a young black man who cut his hand during the altercation. While looking for suspects, police contact officials at SUNY Oneonta, a nearby college, and a school administrator reacts by handing over a list of names and residences of 125 black male students. For the next several days, those students are tracked down and interrogated by various police departments under a presumption of guilty until proven innocent. In Brothers of the Black List, director Sean Gallagher tracks this story of racism that became the longest litigated civil rights case in American history. The now grown students and their school counselor, Edward “Bo” Whaley, recount the disturbing events that the college and police department tried sweeping under the rug for many years thereafter. An emotional story of social justice, this unsettling documentary is also a cautionary tale of equal rights gone wrong that is relevant today more than ever.

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