When

Sunday, April 19, 2015 - 2:00pm

Tickets & Registration

FREE Admission | RSVP Required

RSVP Now

Tags

Support

The Helis Foundation is a Louisiana private foundation, established and funded by the William Helis Family. The Arts Funds of The Helis Foundation advance access to the arts for the community through contributions that sustain operations for, provide free admission to, acquire works of art, and underwrite major exhibitions and projects of institutions within the Greater New Orleans area.
The CAC is supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works. The CAC is supported in part by a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans as administered by the Arts Council New Orleans.

Join us for this exploratory guided tour of the exhibition Radcliffe Bailey: Recent Works. The tour will be led by CAC Education & Public Programs Manager, Mariana Sheppard, who will be joined by Jennifer Williams, Curator of The McKenna Museum of African American Art.

Radcliffe Bailey: Recent Works is organized by the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans; the exhibition’s Curatorial Advisor Carol Thompson, the Fred and Rita Richman Curator of African Art at High Museum of Art in Atlanta; and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. It includes the eighth iteration of Windward Coast, Bailey’s magnum opus that grew out of his earlier experimentation, Storm at Sea. Bailey first created Windward Coast in 2010 while in residence at Florida’s Atlantic Center for the Arts. Both Windward Coast and Storm at Sea are site specific, large-scale installations, made of piano keys—including the long sounding devices that stretch into the body of the instrument—strewn across the floor to look like the surface of the sea. 

The exhibition includes a small set of works dedicated to the Yoruba trickster deity who is also the artist’s alter ego: Eshu-Elegba, mediator of opposites who brings together different worlds. Other recent works reflect the artist’s love of making big things. These large-scale, minimalist, abstract sculptural works—at once both two- and three-dimensional—project both pathos and a profound sense of serenity, with a hypnotic, repetitive aesthetic similar to Japanese rock gardens. A gargantuan, out-of-scale, nearly ten foot high wood sculpture in the form of a music stand presides over the entire creative orchestration, with site-specific trumpet sounds inspired by the installation of the piece and recorded live by former CAC composer-in-residence Hannibal Lokumbe. The work of the jazz trumpeter and composer play in a continuous loop—a fully integrated aspect of the piece— as visual art, music, and performance become one in this gathering of Bailey’s most recent works.

Share This