When

Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 7:00pm

Tickets & Registration

Free for CAC Members

$5 Suggested Donation for Non-Members

Where

Support

Support for this exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.
The Helis Foundation is a Louisiana private foundation, established and funded by the William Helis Family. The Arts Funds of The Helis Foundation advance access to the arts for the community through contributions that sustain operations for, provide free admission to, acquire works of art, and underwrite major exhibitions and projects of institutions within the Greater New Orleans area.
Support for this exhibition provided by the Sydney & Walda Besthoff Foundation
The CAC is supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works. The CAC is supported in part by a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans as administered by the Arts Council New Orleans.

A conversation with scholar Colette Gaiter about Emory Douglas and visual politics of the Black Panther Party.

Colette Gaiter

Colette Gaiter is the Associate Professor of Visual Communication at the University of Delaware. After working in graphic design she became an educator, artist, and writer, exhibiting her work internationally and in galleries, museums, and public institutions in the United States. Her work ranges from digital prints and artist books to web sites and interactive installations. Venues include the Studio Museum Harlem, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Contemporary Arts Museum of Houston. Her work ranges from digital prints and artist books to web sites and interactive installations.

Her writing on former Black Panther artist Emory Douglas’s work appears in Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas, and West of Center: Art and the Counterculture Experiment in America, 1965-1977. Since 2004, she continues to write about Douglas’s work, including his current international human rights activism.

An essay on Cuban artists in The African Americas: A Collaborative Project on the African Diaspora in the Cultures of Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States reflects her visits to the island to study art and culture.

Putting her interest in socially engaged art into practice, she initiated two community projects in Wilmington, Delaware— Urban Garden Cinema and The Beauty Shop Project, currently underway.

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