When

Tuesday, May 29, 2018 to Friday, June 1, 2018

Tickets & Registration

Birdfoot 2018 Open Rehearsals 

Tuesday, May 29: 10am–11:30pm

Wednesday, May 30: 11–1pm

Thursday, May 31: 2pm–4pm

 

Birdfoot Festival 2018: Birdfoot Backstage

Thursday, May 31, 2017

7 pm (6:00 PM Happy Hour; 6:15 PM Young Artist Program Showcase Concert)

Free Admission with Advanced Reservations Suggested

Friday, June 1, 2018

8 PM (7 PM Introduction to the Music by Patrick Castillo)

$25 General, $20 CAC Members, $15 Students

 

Where

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The Birdfoot Festival has gained an enthusiastic following and glowing critical reviews for its fresh approach and “youthful, rule-bending style." Get ready for a week of "risky, high-wire playing" as Birdfoot's seventh annual international chamber music arrives at the Contemporary Arts Center of New Orleans. As part of a residency partnership with the CAC, the festival will rehearse, perform, and stage part of its city­wide performance series from the CAC May 30–June 2, 2018.

Birdfoot presents performances by world-class musicians in intimate spaces so that you can be near the action. Cutting-edge contemporary works rub shoulders with  older masterpieces to reveal music that speaks with timeless wisdom and urgent relevance. Join the festival for one-of-a-kind performances that take place in the highly social spaces where this music was meant to be experienced.

Birdfoot 2018 @ The CAC: Open Rehearsals

As part of the Birdfoot Festival 2018 @ the CAC residency, Birdfoot invites the community to attend its rehearsals on May 29, 30, and 31.

Come behind the scenes and sit in on the creative process as Birdfoot artists prepare great works of chamber music for concerts across New Orleans. Visual artists are welcome to bring their sketchpads—no photography or recording, please.

Tuesday, May 29: 10am–11:30pm

Wednesday, May 30: 11–1pm

Thursday, June 31: 2pm–4pm

 

Birdfoot Festival 2018: Birdfoot Backstage

Thursday, May 31, 2017

7 pm (6:00 PM Happy Hour; 6:15 PM Young Artist Program Showcase Concert)

Contemporary Arts Center

900 Camp Street

Downtown New Orleans

Free Admission with Advanced Reservations Suggested

Featured music:

George Enescu: Octet in C Major, Op. 7

Join Birdfoot Festival musicians and WWNO 89.9 FM “backstage” in a conversation about Enescu’s ravishing Octet. Inspired throughout his life by the folk-music of his native Romania, George Enescu’s Octet is one of the composer’s most ambitious works and explodes off the page. Although you’d never know it listening to this piece, Ensecu knew that he had embarked on something ambitious in composing the Octet, writing: “An engineer launching his first suspension bridge over a river, could not feel more anxiety than I felt when I set out to darken my paper.” Join Birdfoot Festival musicians to explore the Octet’s rhapsodic style, inner workings, and the musical ideas that interweave to form a grand cyclical narrative.

Presented with support from the Contemporary Arts Center’s Performance Support Program, this event is an opportunity to get inside the music and experience why this piece is a favorite of musicians and listeners alike. Join the conversation!

 

Birdfoot Festival 2018: Alla Zingarese

Friday, June 1, 2018

8 PM (7 PM Introduction to the Music by Patrick Castillo)

Contemporary Arts Center

900 Camp Street

Downtown New Orleans

$25 General, $20 CAC Members, $15 Students

Program:

Joseph Haydn: String Quartet Op. 76 no. 2 “Fifths”

Osvaldo Golijov: Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind for String Quartet & Klezmer Clarinet

Johannes Brahms: Piano Quartet no. 1 in G minor, Op. 25

This concert traces a tale of two musical diasporas. Music travels with people and there are few people more famous for their music (or travels) than the Romani. Long persecuted in Europe and known disparagingly as Gypsies, Tzigane, Zigeuner, or Zingaro, the Romani originally came from India, perhaps descendants of a traveling caste of musicians and dancers. Both Brahms and Haydn took inspiration from the music of the Romani in Hungary and often wrote pieces marked Alla Zingarese or “in gypsy style,” bringing music of the street and tavern (music that was otherwise excluded from the halls of power) into palaces and concert halls. Haydn took glee in writing rolicking gypsy minuets and rondos—one of these appears in his String Quartet Op. 76 no. 2. Likewise, the music of the Hungarian gypsies provided Brahms with some of his most fertile musical inspiration, as in the last movement of his G minor Piano Quartet, marked alla zingarese.

Klezmer music, too, has traveled with its people. Meaning “instrument of song”, Klezmer has blessed births, weddings, and burials, generation by generation. Argentine composer Osvaldo Golijov’s Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind takes inspiration from the great kabbalist rabbi of Provence. Golijov writes that Isaac the Blind believed “that all things and events in the universe are product of combinations of the Hebrew alphabet's letters: "Their root is in a name, for the letters are like branches, which appear in the manner of flickering flames, mobile, and nevertheless linked to the coal.”

Note: This concert will be preceded by a 7 PM Introduction to the Music given by renowned speaker and presenter Patrick Castillo.

This concert is presented with support from the Contemporary Arts Center’s Performance Support Program.

 

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